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Full text of "The Tattler"

THE TATTLER 
1951 













THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 

1951 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




Dedicsli 



on 

JEAN HATHAWAY 

The graduates of the Class of 1951 have 
only one regret, that someone greater than we, 
has called Jean Hathaway's warmth to Him. 
But we still feel your presence, Jean; we still 
see your smile; we still remember your enduring 
friendship; and we dedicate the "Tattler" a his- 
tory of our achievements together, to you. 



THE TATTLER 




Jllemorial 

MR. FOSTER 

It is our hope that this issue of the "Tattler" 
will be the best in the history of Williamsburg 
High School so that it will be worthy of serving 
as a memorial to Mr. Edward Foster, con- 
scientious public servant, patient teacher of the 
youth, and dear and respected friend of all who 
knew him. 



THE TATTLER 

Williamsburg High School 



Editor-in-Chief ........ Murilyn Graves 

Assistant Editor Jane Smith 

Business Manager Gilbert Sears 

Assistants .... Bruce Purrington, Richard Houghton 
Harry Pomeroy, Joan Culver, Gail Papineau 

Literary Editor Dorothy Brewer 

Assistant Betty Hathaway 

Alumni Editor Joan Damon 

Sports Editor Gilbert Sears 

Assistant ... Marilyn Black 

Artist Dorothy Brewer 

Faculty Advisors . . Maria Lovechio, Frances Grinnell 



CONTENTS 

Dedication 2 

Memorial 3 

Faculty 5 

Editorial 6 

Class Play 8 

Senior Class Pictures . . 10 

Class History 16 

Class Will 17 

Prophecy 18 

Prophecy on Prophetess 23 

Class Grinds 24 

Class Statistics 26 

Literary 28 

Underclassmen 30 

Activities 35 

Sports 40 

Alumni Notes 42 

Advertisements 43 





ANNE T. DUNPHY 






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FRANCES GRINNELL 



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EARL TONET 



FACULTY 




GERALD RITTER 



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MARIA LOVECHIO 



ROBERT BRANCH 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



(editorial 



On June twenty-first of this eventful 
year, the class of nineteen hundred 
and fifty one will, for the last time as 
a united class, walk into the high 
school which for so many years has 
stood as a beacon of success, and 
there receive the reward for which its 
members have conscientiously striven. 
One by one as each is given the 
diploma which will make him a high 
school graduate, a future citizen of the 
world, sorrow will grasp him because 
even thouah his goal has been accom- 
plished, each is leaving behind some 
experience which can never be relived. 

Indeed this has been a significant 
and never to be forgotten year for the 
students and all concerned with school 
or community affairs. In the high 
school this year was achieved a har- 
mony between student and teacher, a 
fellowship, never before felt to such a 
degree, which enabled this school to 
go ahead by leaps and bounds with 
its aims. 

It has been a year of sorrow and 
happiness, both deeply shared by all. 
The death of an ever faithful senior 
classmate, closely followed by that of 
a beloved teacher, struck profoundly 
at the hearts of each and every per- 
son who knew them. National and in- 
ternational affairs affected us as did 
community problems; as the cold war 
became a bloody reality and former 
classmates joined the noble cause, 
new anxiety as to the future, ours and 
the world's, was added to the old. 
But with these trials and tribulations 
came joys! With the hiring of a new 
faculty member and retaining of re- 
spected older ones, a year of success- 
ful school activities resulted from the 
harmonious school spirit. 

School became alive and intriguing 
as larger and better assembly pro- 
grams were carefully planned with 
student and faculty participation. 
Speakers representing various occupa- 
tions and professions were obtained 
whereby knowledge was extended in 



many fields from nursing to library 
work. 

Painless education was provided by 
means of more frequent movies which 
improved in interest. New instruments 
and materials were bought when pos- 
sible upon suggestions of students and 
faculty so that classes meant excite- 
ment rather than drudgery. 

School spirit soared high in busses 
to basketball games, on the basketball 
floor, at parties, and debates. Instead 
of the usual strife between classes, 
there was a unification of goals as one 
and all watched our school progress. 
Probably the most notable headway 
was made in sports. As the green 
wave swept down the basketball year 
with the record of eight wins and four 
losses, the school experienced with it 
a new achievement — that of true 
school spirii. The majority of students 
watched as the best coach of all times 
at Williamsburg High School encour- 
aged his boys to victory. At the end 
of the season, praise well-deserved 
was showered on the three factors re- 
sponsible for a good year — the hard- 
working coach, faithful players, and 
roaring crowd backing them. 

True, the school in the future will 
see better years when new classrooms 
are added, a new gymnasium is built, 
excellent sports records are made and 
debating plaques are hanging on the 
wall; but we, the class of nineteen hun- 
dred fifty one, will be able to say that 
we were part of the beginning, and as 
alumni we will work harder toward 
greater progress. 

Yes, it was a sorrowful year; but we 
will think of it, too, as a year when 
Williamsburg -High School had one of 
the best groups of teachers to come 
here; a year of improvement and en- 
joyment; a year never to be forgotten 
and always to be remembered. 

MURILYN GRAVES 



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WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



The climax of the Senior Class activities was the presentation of the 
play, "He Couldn't Marry Five," a comedy in which a young man is pursued 
by five pretty, talented sisters. 

The reward for long hours of rehearsals, under the direction of Eugene 
Titus, was the eagerly awaited trip to New York during the April vacation. 

The cast was as follows: 

Donald Regan Bruce Purrington 

Mother ... Betty Hathaway 

Father Harry Pomeroy 

April Dorothy Brewer 

May Murilyn Graves 

June Jean Ellen Harlow 

Taris Jane Smith 

Leona Marlene Shay 

Etta Shirley Hathaway 

Granny .... Marilyn Black 



THE TATTLER 




ON STAGE, EVERYBODY! 



10 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




JOAN BARBARA BACHAND 

"Joanie" Noted for Dancing 

Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Chorus 3; Club 51 Com- 
mittee 3; Dramatic Club 2; Freshman Recep- 
tion Committee 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; 
Play Committee 4; Sadie Hawkins Day Com- 
mittee 3; School Paper Staff 1; Student 
Council 2, 3. 



JOAN KATHLEEN BALDWIN 

"Joanie" Noted for Excuses 

Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Chorus 3, 4; Class Play 
Committee 4; Club 51 Committee 3; Dra- 
matic Club 2; Freshman Reception Commit- 
tee 3; Glee Club 3, 4; Prom Committee 3; 
Sadie Hawkins Day Committee 3; Student 
Council 2, 3. 





RUTH LOUISE BISBEE 

"Ruthie" Noted for Deviltry 

Class Historian 1, 3; Club 51 Committee 3; 
Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Reception 
Committee 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Junior Prom 3; Sadie Hawkins Day Com- 
mittee 3; School Paper Staff 3, 4; Student 
Council 2, 3. 



THE TATTLER 



11 



MARILYN FAY BLACK 

"Blackie" Noted for Going Steady- 

Basketball 1, 2, 4; Cheerleader 4; Chorus 4 
Class Historian 4; Class Play Committee 4 
Club 51 Committee 3; Dramatic Club 2 
Freshman Reception Committee 2, 3; Glee 
Club 1, 2; Junior Prom 3; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Sadie Hawkins Day Committee 3; School 
Paper Staff 2, 3, 4; Student Council 2, 3; 
"Tattler" Staff 3, 4; Vice President 3. 




mSMHHHHB 




DOROTHY ANNE BREWER 

"Dotty" Noted for Wolf Girl 

Cheerleader 2; Class President 3, 4; Class 
Secretary 1; Club 51 Committee 3; Debating 
1, 2, 3, 4; Declamations 1, 3; Dramatic Club 
President 2; Historian 2; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee 3; Model Congress 1; Sadie Hawkins 
Day Committee 3; School Paper Staff 2, 3, 4; 
Student Council 2, 3; "Tattler" Staff 4. 



AARON HOBART BROWN 

"Leadfoot" Noted for Decrepit Hudson 

Club 51 Committee 3; Freshman Reception 
Committee 3, 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; 
Sadie Hawkins Day Committee 3; Student 
Council 2, 3. 




12 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




ARTHUR EDWARD CLARY 

"Archy" Noted for The Draper 

Class President 2; Club 51 Committee 3; De- 
bating 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2; Fresh- 
man Reception Committee 4; Junior Prom 
Committee 4; Sadie Hawkins Day Commit- 
tee 3; Student Council 2, 3; Student Council 
President 2. 



ALICE CORINNE CURTIS 

Noted for Many Meetings 

Cheerleader 4; Chorus 3, 4; Club 51 Com- 
mittee 3; Freshman Reception Committee 4; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom Committee 
3; Sadie Hawkins Day Committee 3; Student 
Council 2, 3. 






BARBARA LOUISE DURBIN 

"Bobbie" Noted for Giggling 

Club 51 Committee 3; Dramatic Club 2; 
Freshman Reception Committee 4; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; Sadie Hawkins Day 
Committee 3; Class Secretary 4; Student 
Council 2, 3; Student Council Secretary 2, 3; 
Vice President 2. 



THE TATTLER 



13 



MURILYN ETHEL GRAVES 

"F. G. M." Noted for Fiddles 

American Legion Essay 2; Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 
Class Play Committee 4; Class Treasurer 2 
Class Vice President 4; Club 51 Committee 3 
Debating 1, 2, 3; Secretary of Debating 2, 3 
Declamation 2; Dramatic 2; Glee Club 3, 4 
Junior Prom 3; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Pro 
Merito 2, 3, 4; Sadie Hawkins Day Commit- 
tee 3; School Paper Staff 3, 4; Student Coun- 
cil 2, 3; Student Council Pres. 3; "Tattler" 
Staff 2, 3, 4. 





JEANNE ELLEN HARLOW 

"Jeannie" Noted for F. D. R. 

Cheerleader 1, 2, 3; Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
Secretary 2; Club 51 Committee 3; Debating 
3; Dramatic Club 2; Freshman Reception 
Committee 4; Glee Club 3, 4; Junior Prom 3; 
"Tattler" Staff 2, 3, 4; School Paper Staff 2, 3, 
4; Sadie Hawkins Day Committee 3; Student 
Council 2, 3. 



ELIZABETH ANN HATHAWAY 

"Betty" Noted for Shyness 

Chorus 4; Class Treasurer 3; Club 51 Com- 
mittee 3; Dramatic Club 2; Freshman Recep- 
tion Committee 4; Junior Prom 3; Sadie Haw- 
kins Day Committee 3; Student Council 2, 3; 
"Tattler" Staff 4. 




14 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




SHIRLEY MAE HATHAWAY 

"Footsie" Noted for Skipping School 

Chorus 3, 4; Club 51 Committee 3; Dramatic 
Club 2; Freshman Reception Committee 4; 
Glee Club 3, 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; 
Sadie Hawkins Day Committee 3; Student 
Council 2, 3. 



HERBERT MONROE NYE 

"Herbie" Noted for Sharp Shooting 

Basketball 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2; Club 51 3; 
Freshman Reception Committee 4; Glee 
Club 1, 3, 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; Stu- 
dent Council 3. 





"Lu" 



LUCIA MARY PENFIELD 

Noted for Good Taste 



Basketball 2, 3; Cheerleader 3, 4; Chorus 
3; Class Play Committee 4; Class Treasurer 
4; Club 51 Committee 3; Dramatic Club 2, 
Secretary; Freshman Reception Committee 
4; Junior Prom Committee 3; Pro Merito 2, 3, 
4; Sadie Hawkins Day Committee 3; School 
Paper Staff 4, Student Council 2, 3. 



THE TATTLER 



15 



GILBERT EDWARD SEARS 

"Gil" Noted for Athletic Ability 

Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Boys 
State 3; Chorus 2, 4; Club 51 Committee 3; 
Dramatic Club 2; Freshman Reception Com- 
mittee 4; Glee Club 2; Junior Prom 3; Pro 
Merito 2, 3, 4; School Paper Staff 4; Student 
Council 2, 3; "Tattler" Staff 4. 





MARLENE EVA SHAY 

"Molly" Noted for "Check your man" 

Basketball 3, 4; Club 51 Committee 3; Pro 
Merito 2; Junior Prom 3; Sadie Hawkins Day 
Committee 3. 



JANE ELIZABETH SMITH 

"Calamity" Noted for Dewey's 

American Legion Essay 2, 3; Chorus 3, 4; 
Class Secretary 3; Club 51 Committee 3; De- 
bating 2, 3, 4; Declamation 2, 3, 4; Dramatic 
Club 2; Freshman Reception Committee 3; 
Girls' State 3; Glee Club 1, 2; Junior Prom 
Committee 3; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Pro Merito 
2, 3, 4; Sadie Hawkins Day Committee 3; 
School Paper 2, 3, 4; Student Council 2, 3, 
Secretary 3; "Tattler" Staff 3, 4. 




16 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



C/ass J-lishry 



On arriving at the field, the first thing 
you see is a large, red beehive, set off 
from the other beehives. This beehive 
is strictly for young bees for the pur- 
pose of teaching them about their an- 
cestors and preparing them for their 
futures, whether it be to go to a la: 
beehive or put their knowledge to work 
in the world. 

On September 5, 1947, a group of 
thirty-eight bees — all workers we 
thought, but, as it turned out, some 
drones — entered the beehive where we 
were assigned to section six, the sec- 
tion to which all newcomers are as- 
signed. The Queen Bee, Miss Dunphy, 
had a section for herself where we 
often went for advice or instruction. In 
each section there was an assistant 
who gave advice on less important 
matters. The name of the one in our 
section was Miss Skrivars. 

We bees elected David Tiley to lead 
us through our first year's labor. Even 
with the help of this fine leader we 
couldn't be excused from the bee-gath- 
ering that the older bees were hav 
for us. We had so much work to do we 
didn't want to bother with any bee- 
gatherings, but we were forced to go. 
As if making us go wasn't enough, 
they made us do fantastic stunts in 
front of everyone including the queen 
bee and her assistants. For one stunt 
some of the boy bees had to dress up 
in frilly costumes and mimic the queer 
acts of a supposedly talented girl bee. 
Singing and several silly dances were 
added tortures. How embarrassed we 
were! 

Most of us completed our first year's 
work successfully so that we could re- 
turn for our second year although a 
few drones had to remain in section 
six for another year or didn't return to 
the beehive at all. Mr. Williamson was 
the assistant in section four, and Ar- 
thur Clary was elected to be the leader 
of us twenty-seven workers. This was 
the year we started a council of bees 
to try to improve the beehive. We 
didn't accomplish as much as we had 
hoped to. 

In the fall of 1949, Mr. Branch, the 



assistant in section two, found that he 
was going to have to cope with twenty- 
four of us workers. Dorothy Brewer, 
our newly elected leader, helped us 
plan honey sales and bee parties to 
earn money for that big time that was 
being rumored about. (The rumor was 
that we were going to, as they say, 
"fly the hive" next year.) One bee- 
gathering, the Prom, caused more work 
than it was worth because we spent 
weeks preparing for it and made a 
very small profit. 

Twenty of us returned last fall to 
finish our last year in the beehive. We 
were assigned to section one with Miss 
Lovechio as the assistant. Being 
pleased with our leader of the year be- 
fore, we again elected to lead us Doro- 
thy Brewer, who helped us put on more 
bee-gatherings. We also arranged for 
a play in which the bees displayed 
their talents, "He Couldn't Marry 
Five," which we presented to raise 
money for our escape from the beehive. 

In April we left for a large field 
where there were massive beehives, in 
fact the largest beehives in the world. 
Here we saw the famous bee actress, 
Carol Charming, act in the play, 
"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes." We flew 
hither and thither trying to keep up 
with everything that was going on 
among the beehives, becoming lost in 
the busy crowds. We saw the place 
where Bee Grant was buried and the 
beautiful statue the French bees gave 
us. We went through several beehives 
including one where remnants of an- 
cient animals and articles that our an- 
cestors made are kept. 

Fortunately, we all arrived back at 
the Hive School safely so that, with the 
exception of two of our fellow workers 
who left us earlier this year, we shall 
all receive our certificates. When we 
m the beehive on June twenty- 
first we shall be free to do anything we 
please, but whatever we do or wher- 
ever we fly, we shall always remember 
the happy years spent in the Academy 
for the Betterment of Honeybees, Wil- 
liamsburg Hive School. 

BETTY HATHAWAY 



THE TATTLER 



17 



Class %fi 



The Senior Class of '51, being of 
sound mind and body, do hereby be- 
queath the following articles to the 
members of Williamsburg High School 
who have yet to attain the high stand- 
ards and excellent reputation estab- 
lished by this class. 

Aaron Brown wills to Mr. Branch a 
season's pass to the Plaza so that he 
won't have to disguise himself as a 
wash woman to get in to see the next 
installment of the Saturday serial. 
Aaron also leaves the Hudson to sci- 
ence to see if IT can be explained. 

Joan Baldwin wills to Miss Lovechio 
a pair of stilts so she won't feel embar- 
rassed when standing alongside Tony 
Soltys. 

The Chemistry Class wills Mr. Ritter 
the answers to all the questions asked 
him in that period. 

To Miss Dunphy we leave a lie de- 
tector to be used on any students who, 
unlike the Seniors, write their own ex- 
cuses or cut classes. 

We will Mr. Merritt the balance of 
the Senior Class treasury to establish a 
school fund so Miss Dunphy won't have 
to use the milk money for debates, 
games, etc. 

To Mrs. Grinnell we leave a new 
supply of coat hooks to replace those 
which every year seem to disappear 
mysteriously from the coat-room of 
the Freshmen. 

We bequeath to Mr. Tonet a mega- 
phone so that at basketball games the 
players can hear him as well as the 
spectators did this year. 

Shirley Hathaway leaves to Barbara 
Derouin and Janice Richardson the 
knowledge she has garnered from not 
attending school. 

Jane Smith wills to Mr. Branch a 
little peace and quiet in next year's 
American History Class. 

Betty Hathaway leaves her ability to 
make friends on trains to Jean Tiley, 



with the hope that she will do as well 
on her class trip to New York as Betty 
did. 

Ruth Bisbee, Dorothy Brewer and 
Jean Ellen Harlow leave their uncon- 
trollable and unpredictable fits of silli- 
ness to Sondra Black, Jane Beals and 
Nancy Bickford. 

Murilyn Graves wills her right to go 
home two periods before the close of 
school to Frank Smith, who is always 
complaining about long school hours. 

Joan Bachand bequeaths her typing 
efficiency and speed to David Heath 
with the hope that he can get his 
thirty-word award in the next two 
years. 

Arthur Clary wills the remaining 
pieces of the cat he dissected to Sidney 
Nichols if there's enough of the cat left. 

Gilbert Sears wills all the alcohol he 
made in the lab to Harry Pomeroy on 
the condition that he use it for the ad- 
vancement of humanity. 

Lucia Penfield leaves her job as 
attendance recorder to Eileen O'Brien, 
the "efficient secretary" of the future. 

Barbara Durbin bequeaths her sup- 
ply of "nothing" to chatter about to 
Helen Sroczyk, who, as we all know, is 
always being kept after school for talk- 
ing in class. 

Herbie Nye leaves his basketball 
sweater to Norman Stone on condition 
that he make the first team next year. 

Marlene Shay wills a well-worn dic- 
tionary to Elson Hathaway who will 
really wear it out. 

Alice Curtis leaves her chattering 
and giggling but not her man to Joan 
Damon — Joan can get the latter for 
herself. 

To Ellen Ames, Marilyn Black leaves 
her "journal" of the "scoops" of the 
day with the understanding that she 
keep it up to date. 



18 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



To all assembled here, we leave the 
hope that we will be missed, if not for 
the things we did during our term of 
residence, at least for the things we 
thought of but didn't do. 

Executed on this twentieth day of 
June, in the year of our Lord, one thou- 
sand nine hundred and fifty-one, in 



witness whereof we have hereunto 
subscribed our names. 

Witnessed by: 

The Ghost of the Snack Bar 
Cyrano de Bergerac's hat 
The Baby (Class Mascot) 

GILBERT SEARS 



Proph 



ropnecy 



In September, 1971, I once again 
threw my clothes into my knapsack, 
set it on my back, hopped a passing 
freight ship, and returned to America, 
after years of hard labor in the Wom- 
en's Auxiliary of the Foreign Legion. 
The main reason for my choosing this 
particular time to come home was in 
order to be present at Old Home Week 
in Williamsburg and Haydenville, an 
event celebrated just once in twenty- 
five years. 

I had a personal reason for choosing 
this time also; I had to find out some- 
thing very important about my old 
classmates and this was the perfect 
time to do it. Ever since graduation 
I had been haunted by a prediction 
that was made of our class. Had it 
come true? How I hoped not! 

What a gala week of festivities had 
been planned! An event of opening 
day was a square dance to raise 
money for the new gym. I was quite 
shocked when I first heard that they 
were still having drives and assemblies 
for Mr. Tonet's new gym, but after all, 
it is only twenty years since it was 
started! Naturally, I simply had to go 
to the dance now that I knew that it 
was for such a noble cause. 

Of course I hadn't been home in 19 
years and things certainly do change, 
so, I called lean Ellen before going to 
the dance, and asked her to show me 
around town again. Why you wouldn't 
believe it, but Bid's store is all that is 
left of Old Main Street. It bulges a little 
at the seams now, but at least it still 
stands. Well, anyway, Jean Ellen, who 
is living with her Uncle Tweetie, met 
me at Bid's and do you know, she 



hasn't changed a bit? She told me 
that she had had a good deal of 
trouble getting out of the house be- 
cause Uncle Tweetie, who is a bit 
eccentric, had stood at the top of the 
stairs with a loaded musket, shouting 
that she shouldn't go out until they 
killed the last Indian. At great length, 
she calmed him down and rushed to 
meet me. 

Jean and I arrived early at the 
dance. What a sight greeted me! 
There was Aaron Brown, lounging on 
a chair in the hall. He is the new con- 
stable in Williamsburg. I would have 
never recognized him if it hadn't been 
for his same old Duchess hat. That de- 
crepit item hasn't improved much with 
19 years of constant wearing. Brownie 
certainly has a deep, sentimental 
attachment for that hat. I shall never 
forget the morning we left for New 
York on our class trip and found 
Leadfoot Brown waiting at the station, 
wearing his cowboy boots and Duch- 
ess hat. 

Soon after we had arrived, and be- 
fore the dancing had begun, a small 
riot arose in the farthest, darkest cor- 
ner of the hall. As Aaron went charg- 
ing bravely into the melee, brandish- 
ing a fire extinguisher, I heard him 
make some remark about, "Now I sup- 
pose I'll be throwing that Indian out of 
here all evening." 

Aaron had soon curbed the confu- 
sion and I had the greatest surprise of 
my life when he came from the center 
of the chaos, dragging Shirley Hatha- 
way (cave-man style) by the hair. 

It seems that Shirley had gone to 
Canada the very summer after our 



THE TATTLER 



19 



graduation. Exploring the wilds of 
Saskatchewan, she was overtaken 
and captured by a tribe of hostile Wah 
Chugiies. The Wah Chugiies are the 
cannibals of the Tundra Lands and 
they were all prepared to freeze Shir- 
ley for the following winter, but they 
took her right to their hearts when her 
first words were, "Wat you guys? 
Wat're ya talkin' about? Wat you 
guys?" From then on Shirley was 
Princess Golden Tonsils with a seat of 
honor at council fires and a peace pipe 
all her own. This, I might add, was 
not the first time that Shirley's fluent 
tongue had saved her old Yankee 
neck. Shirley married a not-so-brave 
who bears a startling resemblance to 
Erwin, except that this not-so-brave 
wears his head shaved. 

Shirley has now moved back to the 

old home town and is busily engaged 
in trading furs and wampum for Gil- 
bert Sears' Famous Brand Fire Water 
and All Purpose Elixer. ("Not a hic- 
cup in a barrelfull" his slogan.) Shir- 
ley and Gilbert were quite worried, 
she told me, about revenoors. Gilbert, 
you will remember, was one of the 
"boys who made the beer in the cellars 
of old Burgy High." Well, Gilbert be- 
came science instructor at Burgy High 
and so had free rein on the production 
of his (quote) medicine (unquote) in 
the lab. I don't like to mention this, but 
Gilbert lost his job last week when the 
laboratory dissolved. 

"The School Board was very nar- 
row-minded about the whole thing," 
Gilbert told me. "They said I was very 
incompetent or some silly little thing 
like that." 

At this point the dancing started; I 
remember being very thankful for this. 
It bothered me to see these old class- 
mates involved in such dubious occu- 
pations. I began to wonder if any of 
my old friends had "amounted to any- 
thing." Perhaps Mrs. Grendal had had 
the right idea .... none of us would 
ever be anything." I was really getting 
worried .... one of us had better "be 
something" or I'd know the reason 
why. 



I finished the next dance in grim de- 
termination but left immediately after- 
ward, for tomorrow was the day of the 
Homecoming Parade and the Pageant. 
I hoped to really get around that day 
to find out if anybody had become 
anything better than a clerk or a shoe 
salesman, as Mrs. Grendal had pre- 
dicted. 

I went to sleep thinking of wash 
women, shoe-shine boys, and garbage 
collectors. 

I awoke to a lovely, sunshiny day 
and as I lay in bed trying to decide 
whether to get up or not, the telephone 
rang. 

It was Jean Ellen and she said to get 
the heck up to her house and pick her 
up. She had Dottie Brewer waiting 
with her; she said that they had been 
waiting for an hour, that it seemed as 
though I hadn't changed very much 
and all the rest of the usual things she 
always said. 

I quickly drove up to Jean Ellen's to 
pick up the kids. Well, you know that 
if you haven't seen someone for a long, 
long time, you still think of them as 
looking exactly as you left them, but 
Dotty Brewer certainly had changed. 
For one thing, her hair was blonde, 
her eyes were blue and she wore an 
elaborate, black satin dress. Jean Ellen 
was absolutely hysterical from laugh- 
ter and then I knew that they had 
probably cooked up one of their ever- 
lasting little jokes. I very sternly said, 
"Cut the corn, Brewer," and things 
calmed right down. Dotty took off her 
blonde wig, revealing her bright red 
dye job and she changed from the satin 
siren number to a pair of slacks and 
an old, paint-daubed smock. From this 
attire I knew that Dotty had realized 
her ambition to be an artist. She had 
her own small, very small, business of 
making hand-painted dictionary cov- 
ers, she told me, handing me a sample 
of her handicraft. 

The Soap Box Derby was our des- 
tination. All the little boys in town 
had been working madly on their cars 



20 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



for weeks and weeks. But I wasn't as 
eager to see the cars as I was to talk 
to Marilyn Black, who I hoped would 
be there, for I knew that if anyone 
knew anything at all about anything, 
Marilyn would be the one. 

Suddenly there was a roar from the 
crowd as the cars started bumping 
down Village Hill. I realized immedi- 
ately that the roar was not for the cars 
as much as for the cute little blonde 
girl who had entered the race at the 
last minute and was rumbling down 
the hill in an old orange crate on 
wheels. The little boys in the competi- 
tion didn't appreciate it much and 
were doing their very best to run her 
off the road. It didn't phase her a bit. 
Little Blondy skillfully piled the little 
boys onto each other and went on 
down to win the race. As I watched 
this spectacle, I said to myself, "One 
will get you ten that child is some rela- 
tion to Marlene Shay." 

We walked down to watch the pre- 
sentation of prizes and there, just as 
I had expected, was Molly Shay, 
beaming upon the little girl who was 
the exact replica of herself. I chatted 
awhile with Molly, and I found that: 

A. She is married to a midget auto 
racer. 

B. She is still writing and has 
turned out 10,022V2 sonnets. 

C. She teaches physical education 
in Goshen. 

My heart sank; those were all noble 
occupations, but none that could really 
be called "amounting to something." 

Prizes were about to be presented 
for all the sports events which had 
been held during Home Coming Week. 
Names were called and prizes were 
presented to people I had never heard 
of. 

It was rather boring but I pricked up 
my ears when I heard Herbert Nye's 
name being called and called and 
called. "Same old shy Herbie," I 
thought, fust then a dashing young 
man came dashing up to the platform. 



He explained that he was sorry to be 
late but had just received an impor- 
tant call from Connie Mack about to- 
morrow's game. "My gosh!" I thought, 
"Connie Mack is 110 now, but this 
must mean that Herbie has something 
to do with baseball." I rushed up to 
the first person I saw and began to ask 
questions wildly about Herbie. "Is he 
a pitcher, manager, catcher?" 

"Heck, no," was the answer; "he's 
water boy for the Red Sox." 

I was heartbroken. 

"But, don't I know you?" asked the 
voice. 

I took a closer look and cried, "Of 
course you do, I'm Ruth Bisbee, and 
you're Alice Curtis, aren't you?" 

It was Alice Curtis and she was sur- 
rounded by seven tall, blond boys and 
six tiny, curly-haired, little girls. I had 
quite a hard time telling Alice from 
her daughters and an even harder time 
trying to find Russ, her husband, 
among his sons. Alice told me that she 
and Russ are running a Dude Ranch, 
called the Lonesone Pines, in Chester- 
field, and are doing a thriving busi- 
ness. "The only trouble is," they said, 
"we have to lock up the girls at night. 
Those city slickers just go wild." I said 
good-bye to them happily, thinking to 
myself that they, at least, had re- 
mained the same. 

Walking on farther down the road 
in search of Jean and Dotty, I met a 
harried looking young woman who 
kept asking frantically, "You're sure 
you haven't seen him? You're abso- 
lutely positive?" It was Barbara Dur- 
bin, looking for Mr. Merritt. Barbara 
has been the new office girl since the 
week before last and the superintend- 
ent was just driving her crazy because 
he is always going off and leaving her 
with nothing to do and of course, Bar- 
bara couldn't ever stand for that. Un- 
able to help her, I asked her to join 
us for lunch but she refused, saying, 
"Oh no, I haven't time!" Spying Miss 
Dunphy, she ran after her for she knew 
she'd have some work for her. 



THE TATTLER 



21 



Dotty, Jean Ellen and I were tired by 
now and we decided to go some place 
exotic for lunch. We drove and drove 
until it seemed that we would never 
reach Northampton, but finally we 
stopped in front of the Claridge Manor 
on Main Street and went in. Since 
Dotty was still in her slacks, we didn't 
want to eat in the dining room so we 
took the elevator up to the second floor 
where we could eat in the Terrace 
Room. We pushed the buzzer, the door 
was tugged open, and there, standing 
inside, was Good Old Arthur Clary! 

"Hello, Arthur!" I shouted, "Still as- 
sociating with the better class?" 

"Hello," was the blunt reply, a blank 
stare the facial expression. We rode 
up in silence, chose a table easily 
since none were occupied, and waited 
for the waiter. 

"Would you care to order?" said a 
voice. We looked up into Arthur's face 
again. We ordered but didn't say an- 
other word, we were all so angry 
about the brush-off we had received 
a few minutes ago. Our lunches came, 
followed by the check. I walked to 
the desk, handed my money to the 
cashier only to look into Arthur's face 
again and said to myself, 

"O. K. for you Old Boy; it's perfectly 
all right with us if you don't want to 
speak to the riff-raff. We're just as 
happy." I paid the check and we 
walked back to the elevator on the 
opposite side of the room. The door 
was open and someone ran in ahead 
of us and prepared to descend. Whose 
face appeared but, you guessed it! 
This had gone far enough! Between 
the first and second floors, Jean Ellen 
suddenly pushed the STOP button and 
whirled to face Arthur's surprised face. 

"All right, bud, now what's the 

scoop?" she asked. "We don't expect 

you to fall all over us but you could 
at least be civil." 

Arthur stared miserably at us and 
then explained that he had hoped we 
wouldn't press the point. He is the 
owner of the Hotel (the old Draper). 



He is also chief cook and bottle washer 
and elevator operator. He had prayed 
we wouldn't recognize him because he 
was so ashamed that he hadn't 
"amounted to something." We con- 
soled him as best we could and con- 
tinued down. 

Driving back to Williamsburg, we 
were stopped by a road block. There 
had been an accident at the bottom of 
Main's Hill. A new blue Dodge had 
been hit by a garbage truck. No one 
was hurt. We climbed out of the car 
and stepping over eggshells and bread 
crusts, we reached the scene of the 
crime. The sound of gay giggling 
greeted us. There were Joan and Joan 
laughing like crazy. These kids were 
on their way home to Burgy also. 
After many, "Well, well, look who's 
here's!" and "What a coincidence's," 
Jean Ellen offered to drive them home. 
As we passed the garbage truck, I 
glanced in and looked away guickly, 
not because it was such a gory sight, 
but because it was such a shock, for 
there, in the front seat of an old gar- 
bage truck sat our class geniuses: Jane, 
Betty, and Murilyn. I didn't say any- 
thing to the other girls, but I rode home 
in silence, listening to the others chat- 
ter about their various occupations for 
the last ten years. From the depths of 
my misery, I did hear that Joan Bald- 
win was engaged for the seventh time 
to a trapeze artist she met while work- 
ing as a bare-back rider in the circus, 
and that Joanie Bachand had just fin- 
ished making up time for all the days 
she skipped since she was in the first 
grade and she just didn't know what 
to do with herself. Joanie told us not 
to be too terribly surprised, but that 
Lucia was married to Stan and that 
they were living in the ancestral home 
in Goshen, busily engaged in collect- 
ing and refinishing antiques. 

But I still couldn't get the revolting 
picture of the "most likely to succeed- 
ers" sitting grimly in that demolished 
garbage van. 

"I simply have to call Marilyn Black 
when I get home," I told myself. 
"She'll be able to tell me all about it." 



22 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



But, of course, I forgot when we 
reached Williamsburg because we 
were late for the pageant and had to 
rush to get a seat on the hill where 
we could see. 

Naturally the pageant is the same 
every time except for a new chapter 
added to cover the last twenty-five 
years. As we watched each page 
had a lot of fun recalling the parts 
we had each played in the pag- 
eant of 1946. I remembered that I 
was eleven years old and I was a 
blade of grass in the first scene. A 
hush fell over the audience sitting un- 
der the sky as the time approached for 
the 1946-1971 chapter to be revealed. 
My heart was in my throat, for I knew 
that this was our own generation and 
we had very little to show for our- 
selves. I was still plagued by a morbid 
picture of our brilliants sitting in a 
smelly garbage truck. "It would have 
been nice," I thouaht, "at least to have 
everyone here even if they haven't 
amounted to much!" 

I noticed on my program that Mari- 
lyn Black was in charge of the 1946- 
1970 program. "She'll have to be 
pretty clever to squeeze a story out of 
our class," I said to myself. 

The proceedings began to com- 
mence, as the saying goes, and it was 
so dull that I settled back into my own 
selfish thoughts. When the crowd 
laughed, I sobbed inwardly, and 
looked in the direction of the loudest 
shouts and saw Betty, Jane, and Muri- 
lyn pull up in a brand new Cadillac. 
I brightened up a bit and watched 
them race to the platform as fast as 
their thirty-five year old legs could 
carry them. 

Herewith began the greatest and 
most pleasant surprise of my whole 
life. 



This chapter in the pageant was 
called "Men and Women of Distinc- 
tion" and I nearly had a heart attack 
when Marilyn began to read off names 
such as 

Woman of the Year Award to Eliza- 
beth Hathaway, for her work with the 
Department of Sanitation. 

Pulitzer Prize winner, Jane Smith for 
her brilliant novel, "Seagoing Livers." 

Winner of the United Nations Spell- 
ing Bee .... Marlene Shay. 



Athlete of the Year 



Herbie Nye. 



Nobel Prize Winner for Scientific 
Achievement .... Gilbert Sears. 

Director of the Boston Pops .... 
Murilyn Graves. 

This went on and on until I was so 
ashamed of myself that I could have 
cried. How could I have had so little 
faith in my classmates! A wave of 
astonishment came over me as I real- 
ized that I was the only person in the 
class who hadn't amounted to some- 
thing. Those sweet kids hadn't wanted 
to hurt my feelings and so hadn't said 
anything. I was just mortified and so 
glad that I hadn't said anything aloud 
about "amounting to something." 

In silence, I filed out of the Pageant 
field with Jean and Dorothy. As we 
walked along, I noticed a lady who 
sat alone, staring into space. "What 
do you suppose is the matter with 
her?" I whispered. 

"Oh, she is probably just feeling 
bad because her son is only a shoe 
salesman," Jean Ellen said. 

I have done a lot of thinking since 
that day and now I realize that it 
doesn't make a darn bit of difference 
how famous he is or how well edu- 
cated he may be, if each person in our 
class works for his livina, he can be 
counted among those who have 
"amounted to something." 



THE TATTLER 



23 



'ropnecy on 

Paris, Cairo, the Casbah, Venice- 



Prophecu on we Prophetess 



exotic places all; names simply heard 
in geography classes or read about in 
romantic novels to most people, but 
in the years 1951 to 1965 they had be- 
come second homes to me. That's why 
I was finding life monotonous as I lay 
sunning myself on the French Riviera. 
When one has seen all, done all, what 
is there to do but sigh as one wearily 
greets the princes and rajahs, diplo- 
mats, and espionage agents who make 
up the social set along the Riviera, 
reads in newspapers that Rita Straw- 
orth has shed her eleventh husband, 
President Mac Arthur has just fired 
Hary Falseman for making derogatory 
remarks about the singing of his 
daughter Marguerite? 

Tired of burdening myself with the 
complex problems of humanity, I 
turned to the comics in my favorite 
publication, the newspaper read by all 
cultured Frenchmen, "Le Mot Fran- 
cois." Gleefully I watched as Killer 
McCoy backed Dick Tracy onto the 
edge of a cliff at the point of a gun, and 
Dais^ Mae fried Lil' Abner a pan full 
of pork chops as he struggled to free 
himself from his chains. 

A cartoon at the bottom of the page 
caught my eye; that girl leaping across 
the roof of the Empire State Building 
with her camera posed on two men 
glaring at each other while their ma- 
chine guns rattled looked like someone 
I knew or used to know. Now let's see 
— brown hair — camera — machine guns 
— of course, Ruth Bisbee! And a tear 
fell as a picture of Ruth as a happy girl 
of seventeen fled through my mind. 
Of the eighteen members of our high 
school class only Ruth hadn't been 
heard from since 1951. And another 
tear fell as I thought of the class re- 
union to be held at Monte Carlo the 
next week. Only Ruth would not be 
there for she was among the missing. 
Where was she? What was she doing? 
Was she a roving news photographer 
rushing to cover a gruesome murder 
case? A Red Cross nurse caring for 



ropi 

the wounded on the battlefields? The 
owner of a baby-sitters' agency? 

Sadly, I dismissed thoughts of the 
horrible fates Ruth could have encoun- 
tered in life and returned to my cha- 
teau to prepare for the party to be 
given for me that night before my de- 
parture for Monte Carlo. 

A newly-opened glamorous cabaret 
in a section where the streets were 
narrow, dark and dimly lighted had 
been chosen for the party. In order to 
be admitted one crawled through a 
cave-like entrance to a huge door 
carved from a boulder where one 
spoke the pass words "Ho! Ho!" be- 
fore passing the guard in Indian cos- 
tume; then one proceeded by raft to 
a second door where one repeated the 
pass words 'That's rich" before pass- 
ing the guard in Eskimo costume. And 
then one was there! The cabaret was 
a dark and cozy little place dotted with 
Grecian columns carved out of marble 
— ideal for couples madly in love. It 
was crowded with people. A few 
couples danced to the soft music and 
the wailing of the trombone. Some 
talked and laughed at their little 
tables, while others ate heartily and 
complimented the delicious food. 

Then the room darkened, and in 
front of the stage appeared a girl — 
gradually the spotlight went down 
upon her. As she sang, she came 
down, weaving in and out among the 
tables. Her black gown was fitted and 
revealing, and the sequins sparkled as 
the light followed her. Astonishment 
swept over me! Why this was the girl 
in the cartoon! Another gasp of aston- 
ishment! Why this was the long lost 
Ruth Bisbee. It couldn't be, but it was; 
it was Ruth singing. 

As she neared my table, our eyes 
met and recognition glowed on both 
our faces. When she had taken her 
bow, she rushed over to greet me cry- 
ing, "Ma petite! Ma Cherie!" over and 
over again. After running out of silly 



24 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



French phrases, we sat down and 
talked over old times and many funny 
incidents that had happened in our 
four years at Burgy High. I had a dif- 
ficult time understanding Ruth — her 
accent was so thick, but I at last dis- 
covered how she had spent the years 
since graduation. It seems that a book 
publisher had heard her deliver the 
class prophecy at graduation and im- 
mediately bought it for publication. It 
had sold 5,997,010,510 copies in two 
years. She made so much in royalties 
that the publisher had to marry her in 
order to save his company from bank- 
ruptcy. With the money, she had 



started a chain of French restaurants 
all over the world; in fact she was now 
thinking of opening one of her charm- 
ing little places in Williamsburg. 

As the evening grew old and I was 
about to leave, I asked her about com- 
ing to the reunion. She said she 
wouldn't be able to come as she had 
to baby sit that night with her own 
nine children. She would, however, 
make it a point to be free for the re- 
union on the 25th anniversary of our 
graduation in 1976 on the 21st day of 
June. 



LUCIA PENFIELD 



Class C/r/no« 



MARLENE SHAY MARILYN BLACK 

For each student here's a verse, 
Something about them for better or 

worse. 
Some we'll dia and some we'll flatter, 
But please accept it as the latter. 

Joanie Bachand just loves to go out — 
Of her steady affections there is some 

doubt; 
It makes no difference if she hasn't a 

beau 
Never a dull moment when Joanie's on 

the go. 

To sleep by day and live by night 
Is loanie Baldwin's chief delight. 
Hours in class are a waste of time 
To her "no school" is "just divine." 

Ruth Bisbee's our best little story teller 
We predict someday she'll write a best 

seller. 
At coining witty remarks she has no 

equal- 
To find out more you write the sequel. 

A farmer's daughter is Marilyn Black 
She relates the news with the greatest 

tact. 
"Do you know what I heard?" is her 

pet phrase, 
But all kidding aside, Percy's her craze. 



The President of our small crew 
Is dainty, darling "Dotty Brew." 
Listen in class to hear her sigh; 
Suppose she's thinking about some 
guy? 

If you see someone coming with knives 
Watch out! Peasants! for your lives! 
The Hudson that he no longer uses 
Gives Aaron money once spent on 
fuses. 

Arthur Clary is our biggest worry 
Cause he's either sleeping or in a 

hurry. 
His life ambitions aim very high, 
But even so he's a comical guy. 

To no one in our class will this be news 
Soon Alice Curtis her freedom will 

lose, 
For to the altar she will be led 
For better or worse Russell she'll wed. 

Barbara really is a very gay chick 
And usually has a joke to click. 
In French she wishes she was a whiz 
'Specially when Mr. Tonet gives a 
"short" quiz. 

It seems that I am stuck with the end, 
So to composing poems my talents I'll 

lend. 
I've tried my very best to rhyme 
I'll hurry now and not take much time. 



THE TATTLER 



25 



Murilyn is our efficient lass — 

Did you ever doubt that she would 

pass? 
Gene, music, Tattler and all 
Prove that she's been right on the ball. 

Her smile to "Tweety" is so pleasing! 

To others it's just plain teasing! 

She's a tongue so quick and eyes so 

tellin' 
All wrapped up she's our winsome 

Jean Ellen. 

She's always in a verbal duel; 

In English Betty conforms to rule. 

But away from home she's not the 

same 
Especially when she's traveling by 

train. 

There's a girl who's always raising 

cain, 
Though often giggly she's still a brain. 
Footsie, or Shirley is all we hear 
Even when absent half the year. 



Lucia was voted our best-dressed 

girl — 
Ever see her hair without a curl? 
Both fellows and girls agree she's 

grand — 
No wonder with Stash she has the 

upper hand! 

This boy's the tallest in our class. 
Always on the look-out for a gay, cute 

lass 
Doesn't affect his marks or fears. 
Now do you recognize Gilbert Sears? 



Marlene Shay is a versatile girl — 
In spite of this she's never in a whirl. 
She's tall, blond, shy, and bashful 
Composes poetry while at work in the 
First National. 



Smith is her college as is her name. 
Dates are limited but not Jane's fame. 
Four years more to improve her dome 
Then back to Harry on the telephone. 



A popular ball player is "Herbie" Nye, 
But around the lassies he's really shy. 
You can usually find him traveling 

around 
A basketball court or a baseball 

mound. 



So here ends the class of 1951 
Through our four years we certainly 

had fun. 
Though we may aim for higher levels 
While we were here, weren't we 

devils? 



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26 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



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A Study ofi A Class 

Each person in this room sits busily 
at his or her desk, working like mad 
on an essay, poem, or composition to 
have printed in the "Tattler." (That is, 
if he should be so fortunate as to get 
an A plus and if this literary master- 
piece be accepted by the publishers of 
that esteemed magazine.) 

I say that they are all busy, but who 
knows, I am not doing anything but 
cheating. I am writing as fast as I can 
on this paper so that if Miss Lovechio 
should happen to glance my way she 
will think that I am doing what I am 
supposed to be doing, which is writing 
a composition, which I'm not doing. 

I wonder what it would be like if I 
had the ability to read minds? I could 
tune in on all the people in the class 
and find out if they are really working 
as hard as they seem to be. 

Bzzzzzzzzzz what an odd 

noise! Wot hoppened? Hey .... what 
is all that talking? This is a study class. 
Those kids had better cool or they'll 
have Miss Lovechio on their necks. 
Gee ... no one seems to hear it but 
me. What's happening to me? 

There is Normie's voice, but he isn't 
talking; he's busy fooling! Well, well, 
well .... look Ma, I'm reading minds!! 
What is Normie thinking?? "I wonder 
if she will find out I took my last book 
report from the "Reader's Digest"? 
Ahhh I don't think so; teachers aren't 
so smart really." 

Well, and there are Gilbert's little 
brain waves. "And only one in every 
seven million parts of hydrogen can be 
classified as . . . ." Whoops — sorry, 

wrong number! 

Here comes Mr. Tonet. I wonder 
what he thinks about. Let's see now: 
"J'ai faim ..." Oh darn, he even 
thinks in French! And I was going to 
have so much fun. 

Oh! Oh! Aaron's thinking about 
whether he should heave that eraser 



into Arthur's face now, or wait until 
Miss Lovechio leaves the room. And 
look at Arthur, wondering what effect 
being hit by an eraser has upon the 
complex structure of a cat's nervous 
system. Ardour is the boy who got A's 
in biology, you know, when it took him 
six weeks to cut up one little cat. 

Jean Ellen certainly looks studious, 
but you never can tell. Her mind just 
wanders from one thing to another. 
"Glenn .... Louis Prima .... darn 
Junior Business .... Tweetie .... 
Packard's 3:00 o'clock .... so bored 
. . . ." So that's the reason she acts 
so dreamy — those are the kinds of 
things she thinks about! 

Dotty Brewer's thoughts are hard to 
follow, too. "Oh jeepers, what if all 
six of them come to the play on the 
same night? I'll die, I'll just die. 
Frenchie, Pal, and Karl — what'll I ever 
do? Well, if worse comes to worst, I 
can just pretend that I don't know any 
of them. Boy, wouldn't they be slightly 
shocked?" 

7.. s is fun. Maybe I'd better stop 
though, it is getting rather uncomfort- 
able. 

Pretty soon I won't dare look people 
in the eye. Harry might even take me 
for a "ride" because I "know too 
much." 

Huh! The bell?? The spell is over — 
And I have certainly proved my point 
—Who studies???????? 

RUTH BISBEE 

J fly Place Mas Been Jaken 

Debbie doesn't love me any more. 
We've been happy together for three 
years, and now there's another man — 
Freddie. Debbie and I used to go 
places and see interesting things to- 
gether, have loads of fun, and now it's 
all over. 

Three years ago, after George died, 
Debbie centered her affections on me, 
and we have been living in a cozy four 
room apartment on the outskirts of New 



THE TATTLER 



29 



York City since then. It was an ordi- 
nary apartment, but there was nothing 
ordinary about our lives; every day, 
every hour had special meaning when 
we were together. What happy hours 
we spent sitting in front of the fireplace, 
talking over plans for the future! Now 
those plans are forgotten. Even though 
I know that part of my life is over, I 
like to think about the past and remem- 
ber what life used to be like because 
Debbie and I enjoyed doing every- 
thing, even simple things like going to 
the park on Sundays, and buying a 
bag of peanuts and feeding the squir- 
rels. It was wonderful! The warm sun, 
the smiling people, the noisy animals — 
and Debbie. But, now Fred has taken 
my place! 

Usually one night during the week, 
we would go to a movie where we 
crunched on popcorn and laughed at 
the jokes or cried during the sad 
scenes. We always laughed and cried 
at the same things. Not any more 
though. Fred is there instead of me. 

Saturday was the gayest day of all. 
We used to go down-town on the bus 
or subway, do some window shopping, 
and then find some pleasant place to 
eat our dinner. Each Saturday we tried 
to find a different place to eat that won- 
derful dinner together. It wasn't hard, 
with New York's large variety. Then, 
we would take a taxi and ride through 
the city, watching the blinking lights, 
Debbie as fascinated and excited as I. 
Or we would climb to the top of one 
of the large buildings to survey the 
massive city with its bright lights. 
Once in awhile we went to a stage 
show or concert, but it was heaven be- 
ing with her any place; that's why my 
life is so bleak, now that Fred has 
broken up that Saturday party. 

During the summer we went either 
to the beach, or more often, to a cool 
lake resort. The summers were won- 
derful because we were so busy trying 
to do all the things we wanted — play- 
ing tennis, croquet, and badminton, 
swimming, bicycling, talking and 
laughing together. Two whole months 
having fun together! Now what shall 
I do with those two months? 

Debbie and Fred are to be married 
next week. I suppose I shall have to 



live with them, but it will be difficult, 
when I love her so much but have to 
share her love. But, as soon as I finish 
school, I'll go away to college and let 
them live their lives in peace. It was 
hard enough to give up George — it's 
tough for a boy to be without a father. 
But, it is even worse when a boy has 
to give up the woman he has idolized 
■ — his mother, to another man! 

BETTY HATHAWAY 

jhe Burgy Dragons 

Our big star was Gilbert Sears, 
Who always brought forth yells and 

cheers, 
For as we watched our Gilbert play 
We knew that we would win the day. 

One of the forwards was Herbie Nye, 
A very good player and a truly swell 

guy. 
Even though quiet and rather shy, 
Herbie was there ready to try. 

Bernie Bachand was an able guard 
Who was always in there playing hard; 
While he ran and played his spot on 

the floor, 
The opposing team was unable to 

score. 

Frankie Smith was a Haydenville star 
Who made baskets count, near and 

far. 
Frankie's the player who's hard to beat 
Because he's fast and light on his feet. 

Ramon Sears, Gil's little brother, 
Like him we'll never find another. 
Even though he's rather small, 
Ramon would always drop in that ball. 

Peter, Walter, Jimmie, and Gene 

Were the remaining four to complete 

the team. 
These boys helped to make the score 
Of eight glorious wins and losses but 

four. 

The coach of our boys gave a lot of 

time 
And always made them toe the line. 
Although success made him wet with 

sweat, 
We give three cheers — to Coach Tonet. 

JOAN CULVER 



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On The Court 






t - 




R 
E 
C 

E 
P 
T 








I 
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32 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




JUNIOR CLASS 

First row, left to right: Aaron Brown, Jeannine Bernier, Edward Merritt, Helen Baldwin, 

Eugene Penfield, John Warner, Joan Damon, Harry Pomeroy. 
Second row, left to right: Sylvia Nye, Sally Adams, Nancy Bickford, Eileen O'Brien, Ruth 

McAvoy, Gail Papineau, Lois Mollison. 
Third row, left to right: James Magdalenski, Bruce Purrington, Richard Houghton, Norman 

Tiley, Elson Hathaway, Robert Ames. 



Look at this class so bright and fine, 
Posture erect, and all in line. 
Always happy, never blue, 
This is the class of Fifty-two. 

Watch this class; see them grow 
Into good citizens; then you'll know 
That this prophecy shall come true, 
About the class of Fifty-two. 



HARRY POMEROY 



THE TATTLER 



33 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 

First row, left to right: Blanche Roberge, Joan Culver, Jean Tiley, Frank Smith, Ramon 
Sears, Karyl Ronka, Ellen Jean Bancroft, Patricia Evans. 

Second row, left to right: Janice Richardson, Mary Jane Curtis, Nancy Outhuse, Richard 
Purrington, Mary Graves, Barbara Derouin, Julia Kolosewicz. 

Third row, left to right: Wilbur Loomis, David Heath, Peter Shumway, James Johnson, 
Sidney Nichols, Raymond Rice. 

Absent from picture — Dick Pierce. 



Another year has ended 

For the class of '53 

As Sophomores we must take our bow 

For Juniors soon we'll be. 

This year has been a good one 

And we've had a lot of fun, 

We know that in the future, 

When our days at school are done — 

Our memories will drift back 
To this year at Burgy High, 
And longingly we'll think of it 
As the best one of our lives. 



FRANK SMITH 



34 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




FRESHMAN CLASS 

First row, left to right: Ruth Smith, Ann Ice, Ellen Ames, Robert Bisbee, Jane Beals, Bernard 

Bachand, Connie Packard, Mary Smart, Anthony Soltys. 
Second row, left to right: Yvonne Dufresne, Loretta LaCasse, Sylvia Roberts, Carol Harlow, 

Nancy Brewer, Sondra Black, Lucy Mathers, Helen Sroczyk, Barbara Cumm. 

Third row, left to right: William Hayden, Norman Stone, Walter Kellogg, Henry Bisbee, 
Willard Thayer, William Hurley. 



Pictured above is the Class of '54 — 

We certainly will not graduate before. 
Our high school days began at Freshman Reception 

What we went through, we dare not mention! 
Yes, pictured above is a remarkable class, 

Remarkable in that we're all going to pass! 
In years to come in our hearts you will find 

Memories of this year we're leaving behind. 

JANE BEALS 




A 
C 
T 
I 

V 
I 

T 
I 

E 

S 



36 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




"TATTLER" STAFF 

First row, left to right: Dorothy Brewer, Faculty Advisor Miss Lovechio, Gilbert Sears, 
Murilyn Graves, Joan Damon, Faculty Advisor Mrs. Grinnell, Marilyn Black. 

Second row, left to right: Jane Smith, Harry Pomeroy, Betty Hathaway, Richard Houghton, 
David Heath, Bruce Purrington, Gail Papineau. 




-ATOMIC" STAFF 

First row, left to right: Joan Damon, Jeanne Ellen Harlow, Ruth Bisbee, Harry Pomeroy, 

Nancy Bickford, Marilyn Black, Barbara Durbin. 
Second row, left to right: Mary Smart, Lucia Penfield, Ellen Ames, Sally Adams, Sylvia 

Nye, Helen Baldwin, Jeannine Bernier, Dorothy Brewer. 
Third row, left to right: Gail Papineau, Ruth McAvoy, Jane Smith, Frank Smith, James 

Johnson, Bruce Purrington, Murilyn Graves, Jane Beals, Mary Graves. 



THE TATTLER 



37 




PRO MERITO 

First row, left to right: Nancy Bickford, Betty Hathaway, Jane Smith, Murilyn Graves, 

Lucia Penfield. 
Second row, left to right: Bruce Purrington, Harry Pomeroy, Gilbert Sears, Richard 

Houghton, Edward Merritt, John Warner. 




ORCHESTRA 

First row, left to right: Philip Bowie, Sylvia Nye, Sondra Black, Murilyn Graves, David 

Heath, Marilyn Black, Jane Smith. 
Second row, left to right: Joan Culver, Rolphe Bryant, Ruth Smith, Ruth McAvoy, Elson 

Hathaway, Edward Merritt. 



38 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




CHORUS 

First row, left to right: Robert Ames, Edward Merritt, David Heath, Bruce Purrington, 
Richard Houghton, Gilbert Sears, Herbert Nye, Burke Ray. 

Second row, left to right: Barbara Derouin, Ellen Jean Bancroft, Ann Ice, Ruth Smith, Mary 
Smart, Connie Packard, Alice Curtis, Yvonne Dufresne, Loretta LaCasse, Sylvia 
Roberts, Ruth Bisbee, Jeanne Ellen Harlow. 

Third row, left to right: Joan Baldwin, Joan Culver, Janice Richardson, Patricia Evans, Julia 
Kolosewicz, Marilyn Black, Gail Papineau, Lois Mollison, Karyl Ronka, Barbara Cumm, 
Sylvia Nye, Blanche Roberge. 

Fourth row, left to right: Ellen Ames, Carol Harlow, Nancy Brewer, Shirley Hathaway, Lucy 
Mathers, Munlyn Graves, Betty Hathaway, Jane Smith, Mary Jane Curtis, Jean Tiley, 
Nancy Outhuse, Jane Beals, Ruth McAvoy. 



THE TATTLER 



39 




FORENSIC CLUB 

First row, left to right: Dorothy Brewer, Ruth Bisbee, Connie Packard, Miss Lovechio, Sally 
Adams, Anthony Soltys. 

Second row, left to right: Jane Smith, John Warner, Richard Houghton, Arthur Clary, Joan 
Culver. 




CHEERLEADERS 

Left to right: Joan Culver, Alice Curtis, Sylvia Nye, Barbara Derouin, Marilyn Black, 
Nancy Outhuse, Lucia Penfield 



40 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



S 



P 



o 



R 



T 



S 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

First row, left to right: Joan Culver, Marlene Shay, Joan Baldwin, Joan Bachand, Marilyn 

Black, Joan Damon. 
Second row, left to right: Mary Smart, Mary Graves, Nancy Outhuse, Jane Beals, Ellen 

Ames, Yvonne Dufresne, Ann Ice. 
Third row, left to right: Sondra Black, Nancy Brewer, Coach Ruth Mongeau, Eileen O'Brien, 

Sylvia Nye. 



Cjirls EasRefoall 



At the beginning of the season we had a very good group of girls out to practice, 
enough girls so that we had a first and second strinq. At one of the first practices we 
chose Joan Damon as manager to whom much credit can be given for getting our games 
and keeping the girls organized. Our year started off very well with a win against the 
Huntington lasses. Then we fell into a weak path and lost two very good forwards, Joan 
Bachand and Joan Baldwin, from our first string. Then we lost our coach, Miss Ruth 
Mongeau. After our misfortunes we still had more games to play. Two very promising 
players, Sondra Black and Mary Graves, stepped in. The guards wanting to tighten 
up their defense on their own, figured out new methods. With the wonderful guarding of 
Joan Culver, Joan Damon and Marlene Shay as center with Jane Beals, Sondra Black and 
Mary Graves with Ellen Ames as substitute for forwards, we struck ahead in our last three 
games. Other substitutes were Nancy Outhuse, Sylvia Nye, Nancy Brewer, and Mary 
Smart. 





Williamsburg 


Visitors 


Captains 


Huntington 


25 


18 


Joan Baldwin 


Sanderson 


15 


19 


Marlene Shay 


New Salem 


18 


19 


Joan Damon 


Sanderson 


12 


32 


Joan Culver 


Amherst 


19 


32 


Jane Beals 


Hopkins 


12 


38 


Joan Damon 


New Salem 


28 


15 


Jane Beals 


Huntington 


21 


16 


Mary Graves 


Hopkins 


18 


15 


Marilyn Black 



THE TATTLER 



41 




BOYS' BASKETBALL 

First row, left to right: Herbert Nye, Frank Smith, Gilbert Sears, Bernard Bachand, Ramon 

Sears 
Second row, left to right: Anthony Soltys, Peter Shumway, Eugene Penfield, James Johnson, 

William Hurley 



Boys bpoih 



The 1950-51 Williamsburg basketball team had its best won and lost season in a 
decade, also compiling its third best season in the history of the school. Two new 
scoring marks were set when the team scored a total of 481 points in twelve games 
for a game average of 40.1. After losing the first two games the team clicked for six 
straight victories. After a heartbreaking loss to an inspired Clarke school team, two more 
wins were annexed before a loss to Huntington. Coach Earl Tonet deserves the credit 
for the team's fine showing as he spent most of his extra time teaching the team the 
fundamentals and teamwork, and fired the team with spirit which has long been lacking. 
Here are the scores of the games plus individual scoring records. 



Will: 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 



amsburg 
amsburg 
amsburg 
amsburg 
iamsburg 
amsburg 
amsburg 



Will 
Will 



Williamsburg 



iamsburg 
iamsburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamsburg 



30 
31 
47 
50 
51 
39 
28 
37 
41 
49 
37 
41 



56 Huntington 

32 Sanderson Academy 

41 Colebrook Academy (NH) 

49 Alumni 

48 Clarke School 

38 Williston Academy (JV) 

25 New Salem Academy 

31 Sanderson Academy 

47 Clarke School 

46 Williston Academy (JV) 

22 New Salem Academy 

58 Huntington 



Gilbert Sears 11 

Ramon Sears 12 

Herbert Nye 12 

Frank Smith 11 

Bernard Bachand 12 

Eugene Penfield 12 

James Johnson 4 

John Dymerski 1 

Peter Shumway 2 

Walter Kellogg 2 



B 


F 


Pts 


Avg 


79 


23 


181 


16.5 


30 


23 


83 


6.9 


23 


22 


68 


5.7 


23 


14 


60 


5.4 


15 


17 


47 


3.9 


13 


6 


32 


2.7 





5 


5 


1.3 


2 





4 


4. 





1 


1 


.5 











.0 



42 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Jllumrii Jhfet 



ALUMNI 
CLASS OF 1950 



Donald Baldwin — In the U. S. Army. 

Lucy Barnas — Employed by Spalding 
Factory in Chicopee. 

Joyce Colson — Married. 

Anne Gates — Employed by Healy's 
Mill. 

Reta Ice — Married. 

Marion Johnson — A Wac in the U. S. 
Army. 

Robert Liimatainen — Working at home. 

Shirley Magdalenski — -Telephone Co. 

Warren McAvoy — Working at Rhoades' 
Poultry Farm. 

Robert McCord — Attending Business 
School in Springfield. 

Earl Richardson — Employed by Berk- 
shire Etching Company in Williams- 
burg. 

Joyce Morin — Employed by Pro-phy- 
lac-tic Brush Company in Northamp- 
ton. 

Philip Morin — In the U. S. Navy. 

Elaine Outhuse — Student at Vesper 
George Art School in Boston. 

Anne Sabo — Student at Bates College 
in Maine. 

Anna Mae Sincage — Telephone Co. 

Robert Sharpe — Employed by the All 
Wood Products Company. 

Allen Warner — Student at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. 

Charles Warner— In the U. S. Navy. 

Henry Warner — In the U. S. Navy. 

OFFICERS OF THE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

President — Ruth Beebe Emrick 1942 
Vice-President — Lula Bisbee Smith 1915 
Secretary — Gordon Nash 1930 
Treasurer — Richard Watling 1935 
Executive Committee for two vears: 
Barbara Bisbee Swanda 1929, Hazel 
Hathaway Culver 1927, Cathrine Otis 
Merritt 1931, Jean Everett Hemenway 
1940, Thomas Cooqan 1938. 
Executive Committee for one year: 
Margaret Trainor 1923, Marjorie 
Page McKusick 1913, Hazel Damon 
Warner 1915, Richard Culver 1941, 
Wendell Pittsinaer 1937. 

MARRIAGES DURING '50-'51 

Leland Bates '48 

to Margerite LeDuc 
Frank Soltys '39 

to Mary Rivet 



Harlan Nye 


'44 


to Ruth Bowker 


'46 


Stanley Mason 




to Joyce Colson 


'50 


Victor Ingellis 




to Marilyn Williams 


'48 


Windsor Esten 




to Mildred Heath 


'22 


Richard Vanasse 




to Helen Sylvester 


'46 


Robert Edwards 


'42 


to Elsie Foster 




Norman Bates 




to Reta Ice 


'50 


Wilmer Vanderwall 




to Rita Kulash 


'41 


Robert Cowell 




to Elizabeth Brooks 


'46 


Lynn Smith 




to Shirley Shumway 


'48 


Doris Graves 


'47 


to David Nuttleman 




BIRTHS 




Year Graduc 


ited 


Daughter to Marjorie Damon Thorns 


'34 


Daughter to June Demerski Tiley 


'48 


and Howard Tiley 


'49 


Daughter to Harry Warner 


'41 


Son to June Bowker Newell 


'41 


and Robert Newell 


'41 


Daughter to Mary Bowker Connell 


'43 


Son to Roberta Colburn Caldwell 


'38 


Son to Marion Culver Atkins 


'43 



Daughter to Esther Mollison Korowski 

'41 
Son and Daughter to Rita Lupien Miller 

'45 
Son to Dorothy Stimson Harry '42 

and Donald Harry '44 

Daughter to Richard Culver '41 

Daughter to Catherine Vining Doyle '35 
Son to Richard Ames '38 

Son to Pamela Ingellis Wilson '48 

Daughter to Nancy Sheehan Walt '34 
Daughter to George Judd '33 

Son to Norma Nietsche Brown '39 

Son to Harriet Ice Linscott '47 

Son to Lorraine Jones Himme'man '45 
Son to Florence Packard Eldred '40 
Daughter to Reta Ice Bates '50 

Son to Frank Soltys '39 

DEATHS 

Year Graduated 

1890 
1893 
1890 
1899 
1925 



Grace Williams 
William Loomis 
Myra Hill 

Elinor Warner Kellogg 
Edward C. Foster 



^ 

V 



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* 



\ 



\ 



<b 



^ 



Vv 



^ 



* 



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<b 



THE WILLIAMS HOUSE 



FINE FOOD — CHOICE BEVERAGES 

SANDWICHES — SNACKS 

PARTIES and BANQUETS 

Dancing Nightly, with Orchestra and Song 

on Friday and Saturday Nights 

THE WILLIAMS HOUSE 

Phone Williamsburg 511 and 4191 



Robeson and Hester Bailey 



Compliments of 



DANIEL O'CONNELL BUICK, Inc. 



MORE CLEARLY THAN EVER 



"Buick's 



theBuy 



Telephone 456 - 752 



139 King Street 



Northampton, Massachusetts 



Best Wishes 

FROM THE CLASS OF 

'53 

TO THE CLASS OF 

'51 



Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON 
RADIATOR WORKS 

JOHN G. MONGEAU 
346 King St. Tel. 2204-W 



CHILSON'S SHOPS 

W. LEROY CHILSON 

Furniture Covering and Upholstery Supplies 

Awning — Venetian Blinds — Combination Storm Windows and Screens 

Furniture Upholstering — Window Shades 

Automobile Plate and Safety Glass — Truck Coverings and Canvas Goods 

Slip Covers — Cushions — Auto Tops and Upholstering 

34 Center Street Northampton 



Compliments of 



SINCAGE PRINTING 



Compliments of 



THE CLASS OF '52 



Compliments of 

THE LOG CABIN 

Strictly Modern 

JAMES L. RICKARD 

Route 9 on Berkshire Trail 

Goshen, Massachu. r 

Williamsburg 3548 



Complimen: 

COHEN BROS. 



Northampton 



nampton 



1900 



1951 



ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

OIL BURNERS 

RADIO and APPLIANCES 

Parsons Electric Shop 



Phone 1307 



28 Center Street 



Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 

PACKARD - NORTHAMPTON, Inc. 

Foreign-Made Cars on Display Now 

Tel. 4360 

141 King Street Northampton, Mass. 



HAYDENVILLE BUTTON COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers of 

PEARL BUTTONS AND NOVELTIES 

HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 


HAYDENVILLE SAVINGS BANK 

— Deposits are insured for the FULL AMOUNT under the laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

— • Deposits draw interest from the fifteenth day of each month, 
the rate being 2/2 per cent. 

BANKING HOURS 

Monday through Friday — 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. 

Friday Evenings — 6 to 8 


Compliments of 

PETE'S BARBER SHOP 


Compliments of 

WILLIAMSBURG 
GENERAL STORE 

MEATS - GROCERIES - DRY GOODS 

GAS <S ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 

SHOES - BOTTLED GAS 

Phone 294 Williamsburg 


WILLIAMSBURG GARAGE 

C. K. HATHAWAY 

Service Station 

Ice Cream — Candy — Cigars 

Tel. 4351 Williamsburg 


UPLAND FARM 

ON VILLAGE HILL 

GILBERT, DOROTHY and PETER CRONE 

Williamsburg 4831 



Compliments of 

R. A. MacLEOD NURSERY 

LANDSCAPING AND TREE SERVICE 

Williamsburg 

Telephone 211 Old Goshen Road 


Compliments of 

The 
WILLIAMSBURG BLACKSMITHS 


Compliments of 

ALLWOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

Williamsburg, Massachusetts 


Compliments of 

EVAN'S SHOE REPAIR 
SHOP 


Compliments of 

SILAS SNOW FARM 


Compliments of 

HILLCREST 
POULTRY FARM 



BERKSHIRE ETCHING CORPORATION 

MANUFACTURERS OF NAMEPLATES 


LaFLEUR BROTHERS 

The Paint People 

Telephone 374 
82 King Street Northampton, Mass. 


E. C. ADDIS & CO. 

PLUMBING — HEATING 

Electrical Supplies — ■ Pittsburg Paints 

Hardware and Varnishes 

Tel. 3099W 

42-46 Maple Street Florence, Mass. 


Compliments of 

CALLAHAN'S 
5 & 10 STORE 

81 Main St. Florence 


Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON 
AUTO PARTS 

Dealer In 

SCRAP IRON and METALS 

USED AUTO PARTS 

S. R. Shermata King St. 


Compliments of 

MURDUFF'S JEWELRY STORE 

EDWARD J. MURPHY, Prop. 
139 Main Street Florence, Mass. 
Diamonds — Watches — Jewelry 
Watch Repairing 


Compliments of 

MORIARTY DRUG 

PRESCRIPTION DRUG STORE 

JOHN F. MORIARTY, Reg. Pharmacist 

Florence, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



GOULD FURNITURE 



Northampton, Massachusetts 



WESTERN AUTO 
ASSOCIATE STORE 

Auto Accessories — Radios — Tools 
Appliances — Sporting Goods — Toys 



32 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 

J. W. PARSONS <& SON, Inc. 

REFRIGERATION SPRAYERS TRACTORS 

FARM MACHINES and SUPPLIES 

Tel. 2885 75 North King Street 

NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of 



PIERCE'S STORE 



GOSHEN, MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 



WIGGIN'S CANDY KITCHEN 



Compliments of 

HAYDENVILLE PACKAGE 
STORE 


Compliments of 

HILLSIDE ORCHARD 


Herman A. Cohen Phone 1426 

THE FAIR STORE 

WOMEN'S - MEN'S and CHILDREN'S 

WEAR — SHOES 

27-29 Pleasant Street Northampton 


CERRUTI'S 

JEWELERS — ENGRAVERS 

LOVING CUPS — TROPHIES 

WATCHMAKERS 

Northampton 


ARTISTS' SUPPLIES 
PAINTS — WALLPAPER — GLASS 

PIERCE'S PAINT STORE 

196 Main St. Northampton 


Congratulations to the Graduates 

FINES ARMY NAVY STORE 

37 Main St. Northampton 


Compliments of 

THE CLASS OF # 54 


Compliments of 

ROBERT NEWELL 

Class of '41 



RUBY'S 
FURNITURE STORES, Inc. 

Northampton's Largest and Most Beautiful Furniture Store 

Tel. 4200 
15 Bridge Street Northampton 


PADDOCK'S 

CLEANERS and TAILORS 
Suits Made to Order 

$47.50 and Up 
FLORENCE, MASS. 


For the young fellow who graduates this 

year we have everything that he needs 

for this important occasion. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 

KING'S 
PAINT & PAPER STORE 

157 Main Street Northampton 


Congratulations and continual success in 
the future. This is the wish of the leading 
men's and boys' wearing apparel store 
in Northampton. 

HARRY DANIELS 
ASSOCIATES 


WARD MILLER 

Westinghouse and Norge Refrigerators 

York Boiler Burner Units 

Oil Burners & Service 

HOME INSULATION 

14 Center St., Northampton Tel. 2123-R 


MANHAN 
POTATO CHIP CO., Inc. 

NORMA LEE CANDIES 
92 King St. Tel. 771 Northampton 



Compliments of 

HATHAWAY & CULVER 

LUMBER 

Tel. 219 Williamsburg, Mass. 


Compliments of 

TREMBLAY DRUG CO. 

THE REXALL STORE 
M. L. SENDER, Ph.G., Reg. Ph., Prop. 

131 Main Street 
Florence, Massachusetts 


LONGTIN'S 

FLORENCE STORE 

90 Maple St. 

Men's and Boys' Clothing 

Furnishings — Footwear 


Compliments of 

CARL'S APPAREL SHOP 

11 No. Maple St. Florence 


Compliments of 

BREGUET'S SERVICE 
STATION 

FLORENCE, MASS. 


Stop at The 

MODEL BAKERY 

For Tasty Pastry 
82 Maple Street Florence 
165 Main Street Northampton 


Compliments of 

HERLIHY'S STORE 

76 Maple St. Florence 



Compliments 0/ 

BISBEE BROTHERS 

Get Our Prices on Everything You Need 
Tel. Williamsburg 271 and Chesterfield 2145 


Compliments of 

JONES THE FLORIST 

Haydenville, Massachusetts 
TEL. 4331 - 4333 


BEEBE'S LUNCH 

A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 
ICE CREAM and BEVERAGES 

Berkshire Trail Haydenville 
A. L. BEEBE, Prop. 


Compliments of 

BEAVER BROOK POULTRY 
FARM 

LEEDS, MASS. 


Compliments of 

W. E. KELLOGG <£ SON 

DAIRY and POULTRY PRODUCTS 
Tel. 3631 Williamsburg 


WAR BONDS and STAMPS 

WILLIAMSBURG 
POST OFFICE 


COMPLETE TREE AND LANDSCAPING 
SERVICE 

BALTZER TREE SERVICE 

Tel. 44-W 
261 King Street Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 


GUSETTI'S 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


MORIN'S BARBER SHOP 


J. R. MANSFIELD & SON 




FUNERAL HOME 


HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 


South Main Street Haydenville 


j. f. McAllister 


Compliments of 


ESSO SERVICENTER 


' 


Gasolines — Motor Oil — Tires 


CHUCK'S RADIO SHOP 


Batteries — Accessories 




Route 9 Haydenville 


HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 


Compliments of 


SOCONY SERVICE STATION 


O'BRIEN'S PAINT SHOP 






DIAL 275 


Phone 4751 




HAYDENVILLE 


Williamsburg, Massachusetts 



Best Wishes to 
CLASS OF '51 

WILLIAMSBURG FUEL <& ICE COMPANY 


Compliments of 

THE CEDAR CHEST 

177 Main St. Northampton 


Compliments and Best Wishes to the 
CLASS OF 1951 

JACK AUGUST 

NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 

ANN AUGUST 
<& COMPANY 


Compliments of 

BASILE ELECTRIC 

T. V. - RADIOS and APPLIANCES 
180 Main Street Tel. 380G 


Compliments of 

MARIE'S GOSHEN INN 


FLAGSTONE BULLDOZING 

GEORGE D. JUDD 

WALLS — TERRACES — WALKS 
Goshen, Mass. Tel. Williamsburg 4893 



PLEASANT TIME SHOP 



Watches Rings Diamonds 

EXPERT WATCH REPAIRING 



165 Main Street 



Northampton 



Congratulations to the Graduating Class of 1951 

FOSTER FARRAR COMPANY 



YOUR HARDWARE STORE 



162 Main Street 



Tel. 11 




THE WHALE INN 



The whale he swam around the ocean 



And landed Jonah up in Goshen 



Compliments of 



THE BEE HIVE STORE 



SHOES — CLOTHING — FURNISHINGS 



29 Main Street 



Northampton 



W. N. POTTER 
GRAIN STORES, Inc. 

WIRTHMORE FEEDS 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 

Northampton, Mass. Tel. 228 



MORIARTY BROTHERS 

FURNITURE 
NORTHAMPTON 


SERIO'S PHARMACY 

COSIMO SERIO, Reg. Phar. 

Tel. 980 

63 State Street Noithampton, Mass. 


Compliments of 

HAMPSHIRE 
LUMBER COMPANY 


DIDONNA 

CLEANERS and DYERS 
QUALITY CLEANING 

Tel. 323 

56 Ma'ket Street Northampton, Mass. 


WILLIAMSBURG 
MOTOR SALES 

TYDOL GAS 

CAR WASHING — S&H GREEN STAMPS 

LUBRICATION — AUTO REPAIRS 

Phone 576 Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

THE LUNCH BOX 



Compliments of 

THE HAYDENVILLE CO. 


Compliments of 

SUNSHINE FEED STORE 

Tel. 2200 
King Street Northampton 

"A Wayne Feed for Every Need" 


COUNTRY MARKET 

R. WATLING. Prop 

MEATS — GROCERIES 

Haydenville, Mass. 


Compliments of 

REARDON BROS. 

HAYDENVILLE 


Compliments of 

WARREN TOWER 


HICKEY'S ICE CREAM BAR 

Cigarettes — Magazines 

Cigars — Newspapers 

Swift's Ice Cream 

Bridge Street Haydenville 



WOOD & STRAND 

JEWELERS 
Northampton 

WATCHES 

Elgin Hamilton 

Bulova Whittnauer 

Longines Omega 

DIVIDED PAYMENTS 


All Kinds of 

ROUGH and FINISHED LUMBER 

LATHE DOWELS BANDSAWING 

PACKARD BROTHERS 

Goshen Tel. Williamsburg 4073 


Compliments of 

FRANCIS DRESSER, JR. 

EXPERT RADIO REPAIR 
PROMPT SERVICE 

Goshen, Mass. Tel. Williamsburg 4895 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


WM. BAKER & SON 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Service — Courtesy — Satisfaction 

Telephone 2341 Chesterfield 


Compliments of 

H. D. STANTON 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
West Chesterfield Telephone 2523 


Compliments of 

S. A. HEALY AND SONS 

West Chesterfield 


SNYDER'S EXPRESS 

TRUCKING and EXCAVATING 
Worthington, Massachusetts 



GO TO BRANDLE'S FIRST 

To Save Time and Trouble for Your 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

Main Street Northampton 


Compliments of 

C. F. JENKINS 

ICE CREAM — STATIONERY 



GREETING CARDS — MEDICINES 


TWIN CEDAR NURSERY 

EVERGREENS — PERENNIALS 

ORNAMENTAL SHRUBS 

LANDSCAPING 

Williamsburg 


PHOTO BY JONES 

For Expert Photographic Work ] 
Call Williamsburg 543 


E. I. GLARE & SON 

NEW ENGLAND'S OLDEST 
JEWELRY STORE 
Established 1785 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



Compliments of 

CWVc<Saffwm'sO 

150-154 Main Street Northampton 




Compliments of 

MILTON RICE 

Williamsburg, Massachusetts 
Tel. 4603 




HERBS and ANNUALS 

CHOICE PERENNIALS 

For Rock Garden and Border 

HOUSE PLANTS 

VILLAGE HILL NURSERY 

Williamsburg, Massachusetts 


COLONIAL CLEANERS 

Quality Cleaning — Dyeing 

Weekly Pickup — Delivery Service 

CARL SYLVESTER 

Tel. 247 

4 Main Street Williamsburg 




Compliments of 

PACKARD'S 
SODA SHOPPE 


G. J. MORRISON 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 

163 Main — Opposite McCallum's 

Northampton's Optician 





NORTHAMPTON COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 

Founded 1896 

In a period of national emergency the well-trained can be of 
greatest service to our country. 

To make it possible for young men and women to complete their 
education sooner, we are offering an accelerated program which will 
allow one-half semester's work to be completed during the 
summer. 
Seniors may register for either the July or September Terms. 

Northampton Massachusetts 



New England 
Printing Co*, Inc. 



PHONE 



QUALITY SERVlCr 



'Designers & 
'Producers 






2609 



Rear 20 Arnold St. 



Westfield, Mass. 



Compliments of 

HELEN J. TODD 

INTERIOR DECORATOR 
HELEN TODD'S FABRIC MART 

Phone 418 16 Crafts Avenue 

Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 



BROOK'S GARAGE 



GOSHEN, MASS. 





Compliments of 


Compliments of 




CARLSON'S 


THE BOOTERY 




NORTHAMPTON 


Northampton, Mass. 




ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 


Compliments of 




PURSEGLOVE'S 


MACDONALD'S SHOE SHOP 


15 


State Street Northampton 


185 Main Street Northampton 




Compliments of 


Compliments of 




A FRIEND 


A FRIEND 




Compliments of 


DR. O. T. DEWHURST 

OPTOMETRIST 




TER - CAN - GA - KNOLL 


Tel. 184-W 




GOSHEN, MASS. 


201 Main Street Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 

HAMPSHIRE MOTOR SALES 

SALES — SERVICE 
286 King Street Northampton, Mass. 


R. E. CHAPMAN CO. 

ARTESIAN and GRAVEL PACKED WELLS 

Oakdale, Massachusetts 

Telephone Amherst 92-W Edwin E. Wolfe 


NORTHAMPTON PLUMBING 

and 

HARDWARE SUPPLY CO., 

Inc. 

Northampton Tel. 4250 


ACME AUTO BODY 

Tel. 3710 
220 King Street Northampton, Mass. 


Compliments of 

PARKER and SON 

PLANTS and FLOWERS 
Chesterfield, Mass. 


FLOWER HILL 

Cockers 

Blacks — Blacks and Tans 

Our Specialty 

Irene and Tom Breen 

Chesterfield, Mass. 



Every Day 

Is Thrift Day 

at 

A. & P. 



Compliments of 

SONTAG SUNOCO STATION 

SUNOCO GAS — OIL — TIRES 

and ACCESSORIES 

South Main Williamsburg 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



Compliments oi 



R. F. BURKE 



Williamsburg, Massachusetts 



Complimen: 



MORRIS CLARK 



Compliments of 


W. E. & W. O. McAVOY 


FLORENCE AUTO CLINIC 


Growers of Gladiolus of Distinction 


PRACTICAL AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 


The Number One Flower of the Age 


QUALITY USED CARS 


Corms and Cut Flowers in Season 


E. Filkins F. A. Bouley 


98 South Street Williamsburg, Mass. 


Tel. 428 Florence 


Tel. 4663 We Deliver 


Compliments of 


Noble Manufacturing 


Company, Inc. 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 




NORTHAMPTON SPORTING 


DAILY HAMPSHIRE 






GOODS CO. 


GAZETTE 


161 Main St. Phone 715 



Best Wishes From 

AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE 

"The College Which Serves the Connecticut Valley" 

Springfield, Mass. 

American International College is a co-educational, non- 
sectarian liberal arts and business administration college 
founded in 1885. It is a member of the New England Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and recognized by the 
American Council on Education and the American Medical 
Association. It is also registered by the Board of Regents of 
the University of the State of New York. 

Extensive Divisions of AIC are located in Bermuda and the 
Azores. These resident branches were established in 1950. 

The College also operates a Summer Division, which begins 
the last week in June and continues for eight weeks. High 
School graduates with college entrance deficiencies may make 
them up at this special session. 



Compliments of 

F. N. GRAVES & SONS, Inc. 

WILLIAMSBURG 

THE RED MILL 

Nancy <S Ludger's Home Atmosphere 
HOME COOKED FOODS 

Open Daily 12 Noon — 12 Midnight 
Monday 6 P. M. — 12 Midnight 

Route 9 Williamsburg 



PERSONALIZED PORTRAITS 

and it's all done with Lights! 



There's magic in lights .... add a light here, place a spot- 
light there, and your portrait takes on the appearance of real 
form and individuality. 

Your Vantine photographer knows how lighting effects can 
be best used .... How easily they can reflect your personality. 

Your Vantine photographer knows how to secure the 
sharply etched photograph your engraver desires of the impor- 
tant senior year .... The victories of the athletic teams .... The 
brilliance of social occasions .... The Prom .... The plays .... 
The debates .... The expression of everyday life on the campus. 

That personalized portraits by Vantine are important is 
attested to be the fact that over 300 schools and colleges re- 
peatedly entrust their photographic work to Vantine. 



WARREN KAY VANTINE STUDIO 



132 Boylston Street Boston, Mass.